Teatro Real tickets 10 June 2024 - Medea (In semi-staged concert version) | GoComGo.com

Medea (In semi-staged concert version)

Teatro Real, Madrid, Spain
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7:30 PM
From
US$ 139

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Important Info
Type: Opera
City: Madrid, Spain
Starts at: 19:30
Acts: 5

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Cast
Performers
Conductor: William Christie
Soprano: Ana Vieira Leite (Créuse)
Soprano: Emmanuelle de Negri (Nérine)
Choir: Les Arts Florissants
Orchestra: Les Arts Florissants
Tenor: Reinoud Van Mechelen (Jason)
Soprano: Véronique Gens (Médée)
Creators
Composer: Marc-Antoine Charpentier
Librettist: Thomas Corneille
Overview

Charpentier's Medea, the second of the season after Cherubini's inaugural, is one of the most compelling French Baroque operas and a testament to the composer's mastery of the genre. It comes from the hand of the French star duo Veronique Gens and Laurent Naouri, with vivid characters, intense emotions and a very powerful vocal writing. This opera became a commercial and critical success that only lasted a few months, after which it spent almost 300 years without hardly going on another stage.

A characteristic common to all operatic Medeas is that they require a leading lady of enormous vocal and theatrical caliber. Marc-Antoine Charpentier's Medea is no exception to this rule , although –unlike Cherubini's, a century later– its peak moment takes place in the middle of the opera, when, emulating its predecessor, Armide, invokes the furies of the underworld to assist her in her terrible revenge.

Lully's shadow stretches implacably over the only Charpentier opera that, premiered at the Académie Royale de Musique in 1693, passed unnoticed precisely because of the contempt that those nostalgic for the revered patriarch of French music showed towards his presumed successors. even more so if his music showed any kind of acquiescence with the Italian style. Its recovery in modern times – accelerated after the pioneering phonographic record directed by Nadia Boulanger in 1952 – has made it, on the contrary, one of the most appreciated artistic treasures of French opera from the era of the Sun King.

History
Premiere of this production: 04 December 1693, Théâtre du Palais-Royal, Paris

Médée is a tragédie mise en musique in five acts and a prologue by Marc-Antoine Charpentier to a French libretto by Thomas Corneille. It was premiered at the Théâtre du Palais-Royal in Paris on December 4, 1693. Médée is the only opera Charpentier wrote for the Académie Royale de Musique. The opera was well reviewed by contemporary critics and commentators, including Sébastien de Brossard and Évrard Titon du Tillet, as well as Louis XIV whose brother attended several performances, as did his son; however, the opera only ran until March 15, 1694, although it was later revived at Lille.

Synopsis

Prologue
A celebration of the glory of King Louis XIV.

Act 1
Jason and Médée (Medea), pursued by the people of Thessaly because of Médée's crimes, have sought refuge in Corinth. Médée is worried that Jason is growing distant from her. Jason claims he needs to win the good graces of princess Créuse so her doting father, King Créon, will protect them. He suggests that Médée should give Créuse a beautiful robe as a present. After Médée leaves, Jason confides that he is really in love with Créuse but fears Médée's reaction. Créuse is due to be married to Oronte, prince of Argos, who now arrives in Corinth with his army. However, King Créon tells Jason that he would prefer him as a son-in-law. Jason leads the combined Corinthian and Argive armies to victory against the Thessalians.

Act 2
Créon tells Médée he will not hand her over to her enemies but she must leave Corinth. Jason and his children by her will stay. Médée protests that she only committed those crimes out of love for Jason, but Créon replies that the Corinthian people want her to leave. Médée hands over her children to Créuse. Créuse confesses her love to Jason.

Act 3
Oronte promises Médée refuge in Argos if she can arrange a marriage between him and Créuse. She tells him that the only reason she is being banished is so Jason can be free to marry Créuse. They must combine forces to prevent this from happening. Jason pleads with Médée that he is only acting in the best interests of their children. Left alone, Médée resorts to witchcraft and summons demons from the underworld who bring her a poisoned robe for Créuse.

Act 4
Jason admires the beauty of Créuse's new robe. Oronte finally realizes that what Médée had said is true: Créuse will marry Jason, not him. Médée vows that Créuse will never be Jason's bride. Créon arrives and is angered that Médée has not yet left Corinth. He orders his guards to seize her but she conjures up spirits of beautiful women who seduce the guards away. Then she uses her magic powers to drive the king insane.

Act 5
Médée rejoices at her success and plans to take her vengeance to an extreme by murdering her own child Jason. Créuse begs her to spare Corinth, even pledging to renounce her wedding to Jason if she does so. News arrives of Créon's madness and death. Médée touches Créuse's poisoned robe with her wand and it bursts into flame. Créuse dies in Jason's arms. Jason swears revenge on Médée, who now appears in a flying chariot pulled by dragons to announce she has stabbed their children. She leaves as the palace of Corinth bursts into flames.

Venue Info

Teatro Real - Madrid
Location   Isabel II Square, s / n.

Teatro Real is a major opera house located in Madrid. Today the Teatro Real opera is one of the great theaters of Europe hosting large productions involving leading international figures in opera singing, musical direction, stage direction, and dance. Founded in 1818 and inaugurated on 19 November 1850, it closed in 1925 and reopened in 1966. Beginning in 1988 it underwent major refurbishing and renovation works and finally reopened in 1997 with a capacity of 1,746 seats. The theater offers visitors guided tours in several languages, including the auditorium, stage, workshops, and rehearsal rooms.

Founded by King Ferdinand VII in 1818, and after thirty-two years of planning and construction, a Royal Order on 7 May 1850 decreed the immediate completion of the "Teatro de Oriente" and the building works were finished within five months. The Opera House, located just in front of the Palacio Real, the official residence of the Queen who ordered the construction of the theatre, Isabel II, was finally inaugurated on 19 November 1850, with Donizetti's La Favorite.

The Teatro soon became one of the most prestigious opera houses in Europe. For over five decades it hosted the most renowned singers and composers of the time. In the early period, it saw famous opera singers such as Alboni, Frezzolini, Marietta Gazzaniga, Rosina Penco, Giulia Grisi, Giorgio Ronconi, Italo Gardoni, Mario de Candia and Antonio Selva among many others. In 1863, Giuseppe Verdi visited the theatre for the Spanish premiere of his La Forza del Destino. At its peak, in the last quarter of the 19th century, the Teatro hosted world renowned artists such as Adela Borghi, Marie Sasse, Adelina Patti, Christina Nilsson, Luisa Tetrazzini, Mattia Battistini, Julián Gayarre, Angelo Masini, Francesco Tamagno and Enrico Tamberlick. In 1925, the Ballets Russes of Diaghilev performed in the theatre with the presence of Nijinsky and Stravinsky.

From 1867 to 1925 the Teatro Real also housed the Madrid Royal Conservatory. In December of 1925 a Royal Order ordered its activities to be discontinued owing to the damage that the construction of the Metro de Madrid had caused to the building. The government set out to restore it and ordered numerous projects to be drawn out for its renovation, such as that from architect Urdanpilleta Flórez, who proposed a monumental remodeling of the building. However, financial difficulties prevented the completion of these projects and led to a simple restoration, sponsored by the Juan March Institute, and carried out first by the architect Manuel Gonzalez Valcárcel, and later by architects Miguel Verdú Belmonte and Francisco Rodriguez Partearroyo.

The theatre reopened in 1966 as a concert hall as well as the main concert venue for the Spanish National Orchestra and the RTVE Symphony Orchestra. The reopening was celebrated with a concert of the Spanish National Orchestra conducted by Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, and the Orfeón Donostiarra. In 1969, the 14th Eurovision Song Contest was held at the theatre, featuring an onstage metal sculpture created by surrealist Spanish artist Salvador Dalí.

Important Info
Type: Opera
City: Madrid, Spain
Starts at: 19:30
Acts: 5
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