Teatro Massimo tickets 19 June 2024 - Lady, be good | GoComGo.com

Lady, be good

Teatro Massimo, Palermo, Italy
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6:30 PM

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Important Info
Type: Musical
City: Palermo, Italy
Starts at: 18:30
Acts: 2
Duration: 1h 55min

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Cast
Performers
Ballet company: Teatro Massimo Ballet
Chorus: Teatro Massimo Chorus
Orchestra: Teatro Massimo Orchestra
Conductor: Timothy Brock
Creators
Composer: George Gershwin
Director: Emilio Sagi
Librettist: Fred Thompson
Librettist: Guy Bolton
Lyricist: Ira Gershwin
Overview

A production of the Teatro de la Zarzuela de Madrid

History
Premiere of this production: 01 December 1924, Liberty Theatre, Broadway, New York

Lady, Be Good! is a musical written by Guy Bolton and Fred Thompson with music by George and lyrics by Ira Gershwin. It was first presented on Broadway in 1924; the West End production followed in 1926. The story of the musical is about a brother and sister who are out of money; both are eager to sacrifice themselves to help the other. This was the first Broadway collaboration of the Gershwin brothers, and the Astaire siblings play a brother-sister dance team.

Synopsis

Setting: Beacon Hill, Rhode Island and Eastern Harbor, Connecticut

Act I
The brother/sister dance team of Dick and Susie Trevor are so broke that they can't pay the rent and have been evicted from their childhood home. They crash the garden party of wealthy Jo Vanderwater for a free meal. Dick loves Shirley Vernon but is ashamed to pursue her because of his financial situation. Jo is interested in Dick, and it turns out that she was behind the eviction, as a ploy to get his attention. Meanwhile, Susie tries to talk herself into liking the affluent Jeff White, but she finds herself falling for Jack, a charming "hobo"; Jack leaves town.

Jack's uncle dies, and he is apparently a millionaire. Lawyer Watty Watkins is looking for Jack Robinson on behalf of his client, the flamboyant Manuel Estrada, who says that his sister married Mr. Robinson in Mexico. Watty offers Susie $50,000 to help him, by pretending to be Robinson's widow, to get the money from the Robinson estate. Meanwhile, Dick proposes to Jo, since he thinks he can never afford to court his true love Shirley.

Act 2
Dick finally tells Shirley that he loves her, while Watty and Susie (in disguise) execute their plan. Jack finally hears that he has inherited the fortune and returns, still dressed as a hobo. He is amazed to find Susie claiming the money as his "widow". Susie does not know that her Jack is the now-wealthy Mr. Robinson, nor that she is being used by Estrada, whose sister never really married Jack.

In the end, Dick and Shirley are reunited, Jack saves Susie from disgrace by declaring his love, and Jo and Watty pair off happily. All wed happily ever after.

Venue Info

Teatro Massimo - Palermo
Location   Piazza Verdi

The Teatro Massimo Vittorio Emanuele is an opera house and opera company located on the Piazza Verdi in Palermo, Sicily. It was dedicated to King Victor Emanuel II. It is the biggest in Italy, and one of the largest of Europe (the third after the Opéra National de Paris and the K. K. Hof-Opernhaus in Vienna), renowned for its perfect acoustics.

The Teatro Massimo Vittorio Emanuele in Palermo opened its doors to the public on the evening of 16 May 1897, twenty-two years after the solemn public ceremony of the laying of the first stone. 
This took place on 12 January 1875, and ended a chequered series of vicissitudes with interminable squabbles lasting over ten years.
The international competition for the project and realisation of the opera house had been announced by Palermo Council in 1864, and its prime mover was the mayor, Antonio Starrabba di Rudini. 
For a long time there had been talk of building a big new theatre in Palermo, worthy of the second biggest city in southern Italy after Naples. 
Palermo, in the second half of the nineteenth century, was engaged in getting itself a new identity in the light of the new national unity. 
Cultural life was influenced by the new Italian State and the positive consequences of the activity of enlightened entrepreneurs like the Florios, who also made generous donations to the building of the opera house and for some years were also its no less enlightened managers. 
Intense commercial relations led to the convergence and development in Palermo of interests with a European dimension and brought the city to be continually in touch with different cultural models than its own. This was the start of the Belle Epoque, a time of cultural and economic rebirth for Palermo which would in turn become almost mythical for the future generations and was only to be interrupted by the outbreak of World War I.

The opening night happened on May 16 1897: Giuseppe Verdi's Falstaff was the inaugural opera. The conductor was Leopoldo Mugnone. A ticket in the boxes would then cost 80 liras, one in the gallery just 3. At the time of its first opening, thanks to its surface of 7,730 square metres, the Teatro Massimo was the third in Europe, after the opera houses in Paris and Wien.

From the opening in 1897 to 1935 the opera seasons were put together by private firms, often a different one each year, that would organize the performances.

In 1935 the theatre was officially designated with a Decree from the Italian Ministry of Culture "Ente Teatrale Autonomo", and thus recognized as a public theatre.

In 1974 the theatre was closed for reconstruction works that were supposed to be finished in a relatively short time. It remained closed for 23 years and was reopened with the concert on May 12 1997, conducted by Franco Mannino in the first part and by Claudio Abbado in the second, with the Berliner Philharmoniker.

Important Info
Type: Musical
City: Palermo, Italy
Starts at: 18:30
Acts: 2
Duration: 1h 55min
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