Semperoper Dresden tickets 14 June 2024 - Multi-part ballet evening "Plot Point" by George Balanchine, Crystal Pite, Twyla Tharp | GoComGo.com

Multi-part ballet evening "Plot Point" by George Balanchine, Crystal Pite, Twyla Tharp

Semperoper Dresden, Dresden, Germany
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7 PM
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US$ 83

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Important Info
Type: Modern Ballet
City: Dresden, Germany
Starts at: 19:00

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Cast
Performers
Ballet company: Semperoper Ballett
Conductor: Tom Seligman
Creators
Composer: Pyotr Tchaikovsky
Choreographer: Crystal Pite
Choreographer: George Balanchine
Choreographer: Twyla Tharp
Overview

Similar to a theatre play, a film "plot" is divided into several dramaturgical units. In this context, the magic number "three" is a preferred pattern in libretto and screenplay writing. Thus, cinematic suspense is composed of exposition, confrontation and resolution. These sections are separated from each other by so-called "plot points". By presenting three different choreographies, whose common thread is characterised by the aesthetics of the neoclassical, symphonic ballets of the 20th century, the Semperoper Ballett’s new mixed bill will illustrate this guiding idea too.

The triple-bill opens with George Balanchine’s "Serenade": by portraying ballerinas in floor-length light blue tulle dresses in a strictly geometrical choreography to Tchaikovsky’s "Serenade for Strings", Mr Balanchine’s 1935 work diffuses the atmosphere of the "white acts" as shown in classical narrative ballets. In this way, it bridges to abstract neoclassical ballet and new forms of body expression. This is creation is followed by "Plot Point" by Crystal Pite, who presents herself as well as her 2010 choreography at Semperoper for the very first time. Based on Bernard Herrmann’s score for "Psycho" (1960) – completed by additional soundtrack by Owen Belton – the Canadian asks what cinematic narrative can look like in dance today. US choreographer Twyla Tharp premieres with another creation by presenting her work "In The Upper Room" (1986). Accompanied by the commissioned composition by Philip Glass, the company once again demonstrates its enormous body control by performing not only ballet but also a variety of physical techniques such as boxing, yoga and tap dancing, and thus rounds off the ballet evening in this varied way.

"Serenade"
The first part of the evening will be George Balanchine's symphonic ballet "Serenade" (1935), whose title is taken from its music by Peter I. Tchaikovsky, the four-movement Serenade for Strings in C major, op. 48. As a choreography for the students of the School of American Ballet, which Balanchine co-founded, and as his first ballet created in the USA, "Serenade" still represents a significant point in his oeuvre, whose fascination continues to this day. Although Mr Balanchine’s choreography is not a narrative work, it cannot be considered completely abstract, since it involves certain constellations of relationships and emotional tensions between the dancers. "Serenade" presents the ensemble in blue costumes with a matching set design and represents a homage to the "white ballets" of French-Russian Romanticism. This impression is also reinforced by the ballerinas in their long, light-colored tulle skirts and pointe shoes.

"Plot Point"
The middle section of this mixed bill, which also gives its title to the series, is presented by Canadian choreographer Crystal Pite who is making her choreographic debut at the Semperoper with "Plot Point". Driven by the idea of the "plot point", Ms Pite now brings a contemporary ballet creation to the stage, "Plot Point" (2010). Here the choreographer is chiefly concerned with the narrative possibilities of music, its ability to portray a pictorial storyboard: through extreme movements that challenge the body to its utmost elasticity, Ms Pite contrasts single-colored, doll-like "types" with multi-layered "characters" whose aliveness is rendered visual through colorful costumes and rich dramatic diversity. The starting point for "Plot Point" is Bernard Herrmann’s film score for "Psycho" (1960), from which audiences certainly recall the "razor-sharp", squeaking string chords from the famous shower scene.

"In The Upper Room"
In 1986, US choreographer Twyla Tharp commissioned the minimalist soundscape composer Philip Glass with an orchestral work for a new creation: "In The Upper Room (aka Dancer's Notebook #1-9)" offers its dancers scope to perform a wide range of physical techniques. In nine vibrant scenes, defined by a powerful movement vocabulary, ballet meets tap dance, boxing and yoga. The variety of steps and a refined sense of time-rhythm demand both body control and fitness on part of the company. This variety is also represented by the multifaceted costume design, which, in the course of the piece, develops a dynamic that matches with Ms Tharp’s style. The sensual component of this choreography is rounded off by the thought-out combination of light and haze effects. Due to its ethereal effect, this dance work has since become a repertoire classic of many international companies. In the 2023/24 season, the international ballet star will present one of her works at the Semperoper for the first time.

History
Premiere of this production: 01 March 1935, Adelphi Theatre New York City, United States

Serenade is a ballet by George Balanchine to Tschaikovsky's 1880 Serenade for Strings in C, Op. 48. Balanchine presented the ballet as his response to the generous sponsorships he received during his immigration to America. The official premiere took place on 1 March 1935 with the American Ballet at the Adelphi Theatre, New York, conducted by Sandor Harmati.

 

Following a grueling year of touring, Tharp's company took a year long haitus, reassembling in May 1986. The first new piece they performed was In The Upper Room.

Venue Info

Semperoper Dresden - Dresden
Location   Theaterplatz 2

Not only one of the most beautiful opera houses in the world, the Semperoper is renowned both in Germany and abroad for the brilliant star-studded performances by Saxon State Opera as well as numerous international guest artists.

This is the home of the Staatskapelle Dresden, an orchestra which looks back on 460 years of uninterrupted music-making. The State Opera Chorus was founded by Carl Maria von Weber in 1817. Operatic history has been written here, with the Semperoper playing host to numerous important premieres, such as Richard Wagner’s "Rienzi", "Der fliegende Holländer" and "Tannhäuser". There is also an indissoluble link to Richard Strauss, nine of whose 15 operas were premiered in Dresden, including "Salome", "Der Rosenkavalier" and "Elektra". The small venue Semper Zwei provides space for diverse forms of music theatre as well as theatrical experiments, and is also the venue for performances of Semperoper Junge Szene.

The magnificent Semperoper dominates the Theaterplatz be-side the river Elbe, forming the centrepiece of the historic old city. The original building opened its doors in 1841, constructed to a design by Gottfried Semper which combined a late Classical style with Renaissance elements. Following a devastating fire in 1869, the citizens of Dresden immediately set about rebuilding their beloved opera house. This was completed in 1878, also to a design by Semper. In 1945, during the final months of World War II, the Semperoper was once again razed to the ground.

After a second reconstruction was successfully completed in 1985, the reopening of one of Europe’s most beautiful opera houses was celebrated with a performance of Carl Maria von Weber’s "Freischütz".
The dazzling interiors were painstakingly reconstructed by local craftsmen and artists according to original plans, with state-of-the art stage machinery and technical fittings in the auditorium. A modern annex was added to house the administrative offices and rehearsal rooms. Internationally renowned for its brilliant acoustics and incomparable performances, audiences from around the world continue to flock here to enjoy unforgettable experiences at the Semperoper Dresden.

Important Info
Type: Modern Ballet
City: Dresden, Germany
Starts at: 19:00
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