Bavarian State Opera tickets 9 November 2024 - Lucia di Lammermoor | GoComGo.com

Lucia di Lammermoor

Bavarian State Opera, National Theatre, Munich, Germany
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7 PM
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US$ 106

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Important Info
Type: Opera
City: Munich, Germany
Starts at: 19:00
Acts: 3
Intervals: 1
Duration: 3h 5min
Sung in: Italian
Titles in: English,German

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Cast
Performers
Soprano: Adela Zaharia (Lucia Ashton)
Conductor: Aziz Shokhakimov
Orchestra: Bavarian State Orchestra
Chorus: Chorus of the Bavarian State Opera
Baritone: Vladislav Sulimski (Lord Enrico Ashton)
Tenor: Xabier Anduaga (Sir Edgardo di Ravenswood)
Creators
Composer: Gaetano Donizetti
Director: Barbara Wysocka
Librettist: Salvadore Cammarano
Poet: Walter Scott
Overview

“When great emotions cannot be truthfully expressed, they explode with the power of an atom bomb” (Barbara Wysocka). Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor - the Romeo and Juliet of the Scottish Lowlands so to speak - is far from being a private tragic love story.

Rather, it is above all a political tale, which shows how a totalitarian system distorts human relationships at their very core and finally consumes them. The development and extinguishing of unrequited love has provided Donizetti with his most haunting music. Revenge is bloody; madness deadly. And the agony of emotions - according to the Director - “destroys everything and everyone.”

The two noble families of Ravenswood and Ashton have been sworn enemies for a long time. The last of the Ravenswoods, Edgardo, has vowed to have his revenge on Enrico Ashton, whom he holds responsible for the death of his father and the loss of the family home. Meanwhile, however, the Ashtons’ fortunes have also taken a turn for the worse. Enrico can see only one way to retain the family’s political power and wealth and save the Ashton dynasty from ruin: his sister Lucia must marry Lord Arturo Bucklaw. Lucia herself, however, will have nothing to do with this plan. She has fallen in love with Edgardo of all people, who saved her life when she was attacked by a wild bull. Before Edgardo, who returns Lucia’s love, leaves on a mission abroad, the two of them swear they will be eternally faithful.

Lucia’s continued refusal to marry Arturo puts Enrico in a difficult position. He therefore orders Normanno to intercept the letters which Lucia and Edgardo write to each other and to forge a document which would seem to suggest that Edgardo had been unfaithful. Lucia is filled with consternation at the sight of this letter. But only when her tutor, Raimondo, urges her to consent and persuades her that her oath of fidelity to Edgardo is not valid any way as it was not confirmed by a priest does she agree, with resignation, to marry Arturo. Shortly after she has signed the marriage contract, Edgardo returns, to everyone’s surprise. Lucia’s signature is for him such a strong proof of her unfaithfulness that he curses Lucia and the whole of the Ashton family. Lucia collapses.

In order to destroy his deadly enemy at last, Enrico calls on Edgardo the same evening to challenge him to a duel the next morning. Lucia kills Arturo on her wedding night and in her hallucination believes that she and her beloved Edgardo are to be married. The shattered state of her mind weakens her vitality. When Edgardo learns of Lucia’s madness and hears her death knell he kills himself.

History
Premiere of this production: 26 September 1835, Teatro di San Carlo, Naples

Lucia di Lammermoor is a dramma tragico (tragic opera) in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. Salvadore Cammarano wrote the Italian-language libretto loosely based upon Sir Walter Scott's historical novel The Bride of Lammermoor.

Synopsis

Time: Early 18th century
Place: Scotland

Act 1

Scene 1: The gardens of Ravenswood Castle

Normanno, captain of the castle guard, and other retainers are searching for an intruder. He tells Enrico that he believes that the man is Edgardo of Ravenswood, and that he comes to the castle to meet Enrico's sister, Lucia. It is confirmed that Edgardo is indeed the intruder. Enrico reaffirms his hatred for the Ravenswood family and his determination to end the relationship.

Scene 2: By a fountain at the entrance to the park, beside the castle

Lucia waits for Edgardo. In her famous aria "Regnava nel silenzio", Lucia tells her maid Alisa that she has seen the ghost of a girl killed on the very same spot by a jealous Ravenswood ancestor. Alisa tells Lucia that the apparition is a warning and that she must give up her love for Edgardo. Edgardo enters; for political reasons, he must leave immediately for France. He hopes to make his peace with Enrico and marry Lucia. Lucia tells him this is impossible, and instead they take a sworn vow of marriage and exchange rings. Edgardo leaves.

Act 2

Scene 1: Lord Ashton's apartments

Preparations have been made for the imminent wedding of Lucia to Arturo. Enrico worries about whether Lucia will really submit to the wedding. He shows his sister a forged letter seemingly proving that Edgardo has forgotten her and taken a new lover. Enrico leaves Lucia to further persuasion, this time by Raimondo, Lucia's chaplain and tutor, that she should renounce her vow to Edgardo, for the good of the family, and marry Arturo.

Scene 2: A hall in the castle

Arturo arrives for the marriage. Lucia acts strangely, but Enrico explains that this is due to the death of her mother. Arturo signs the marriage contract, followed reluctantly by Lucia. At that point Edgardo suddenly appears in the hall. Raimondo prevents a fight, but he shows Edgardo Lucia's signature on the marriage contract. Edgardo curses her, demanding that they return their rings to each other. He tramples his ring on the ground, before being forced out of the castle.

Act 3

Scene 1: Wolfcrag

Enrico visits Edgardo to challenge him to a duel. He tells him that Lucia is already enjoying her bridal bed. Edgardo agrees to fight him. They will meet later by the graveyard of the Ravenswoods, near the Wolf's Crag.

Scene 2: A Hall

Raimondo interrupts the marriage celebrations to tell the guests that Lucia has gone mad and killed her bridegroom Arturo. Lucia enters. In the aria "Il dolce suono" she imagines being with Edgardo, soon to be happily married. Enrico enters and at first threatens Lucia but later softens when he realizes her condition. Lucia collapses. Raimondo blames Normanno for precipitating the whole tragedy.

Scene 3: The graveyard of the Ravenswood family

Edgardo is resolved to kill himself on Enrico's sword. He learns that Lucia is dying and then Raimondo comes to tell him that she has already died. Edgardo stabs himself with a dagger, hoping to be reunited with Lucia in heaven.

Venue Info

Bavarian State Opera - Munich
Location   Max-Joseph-Platz 2

The Bavarian State Opera or the National Theatre (Nationaltheater) on Max-Joseph-Platz in Munich, Germany, is a historic opera house and the main theatre of Munich, home of the Bavarian State Opera, Bavarian State Orchestra, and the Bavarian State Ballet.

During its early years, the National Theatre saw the premières of a significant number of operas, including many by German composers. These included Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde (1865), Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (1868), Das Rheingold (1869) and Die Walküre (1870), after which Wagner chose to build the Festspielhaus in Bayreuth and held further premières of his works there.

During the latter part of the 19th century, it was Richard Strauss who would make his mark on the theatre in the city in which he was born in 1864. After accepting the position of conductor for a short time, Strauss returned to the theatre to become principal conductor from 1894 to 1898. In the pre-War period, his Friedenstag (1938) and Capriccio were premièred in Munich. In the post-War period, the house has seen significant productions and many world premieres.

First theatre – 1818 to 1823
The first theatre was commissioned in 1810 by King Maximilian I of Bavaria because the nearby Cuvilliés Theatre had too little space. It was designed by Karl von Fischer, with the 1782 Odéon in Paris as architectural precedent. Construction began on 26 October 1811 but was interrupted in 1813 by financing problems. In 1817 a fire occurred in the unfinished building.

The new theatre finally opened on 12 October 1818 with a performance of Die Weihe by Ferdinand Fränzl, but was soon destroyed by another fire on 14 January 1823; the stage décor caught fire during a performance of Die beyden Füchse by Étienne Méhul and the fire could not be put out because the water supply was frozen. Coincidentally the Paris Odéon itself burnt down in 1818.

Second theatre – 1825 to 1943
Designed by Leo von Klenze, the second theatre incorporated Neo-Grec features in its portico and triangular pediment and an entrance supported by Corinthian columns. In 1925 it was modified to create an enlarged stage area with updated equipment. The building was gutted in an air raid on the night of 3 October 1943.

Third theatre – 1963 to present
The third and present theatre (1963) recreates Karl von Fischer's original neo-classical design, though on a slightly larger, 2,100-seat scale. The magnificent royal box is the center of the interior rondel, decorated with two large caryatids. The new stage covers 2,500 square meters (3,000 sq yd), and is thus the world's third largest, after the Opéra Bastille in Paris and the Grand Theatre, Warsaw.

Through the consistent use of wood as a building material, the auditorium has excellent acoustics. Architect Gerhard Moritz Graubner closely preserved the original look of the foyer and main staircase. It opened on 21 November 1963 with an invitation-only performance of Die Frau ohne Schatten under the baton of Joseph Keilberth. Two nights later came the first public performance, of Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, again under Keilberth.

Important Info
Type: Opera
City: Munich, Germany
Starts at: 19:00
Acts: 3
Intervals: 1
Duration: 3h 5min
Sung in: Italian
Titles in: English,German
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