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Henryk Mikolaj Gorecki Tickets

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Modern Ballet
28 Apr 2024, Sun 6 PM
Composer: Maurice Ravel , Wojciech Kilar
Cast: Marta Kluczyńska , Orchestra of the Polish National Opera , .... + 1
View Tickets from 67 US$

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Opera
6 Jun 2024, Thu 7 PM
Cast: Norwegian National Ballet , Norwegian National Opera Orchestra
Modern Ballet
7 Jun 2024, Fri 7 PM
Composer: Alfred Schnittke , Benjamin Britten , Gustav Mahler , Henryk Mikolaj Gorecki
Cast: Czech National Ballet
Opera
8 Jun 2024, Sat 6 PM
Cast: Norwegian National Ballet , Norwegian National Opera Orchestra
View Tickets from 85 US$

Latest booking: 15 minutes ago

Opera
11 Jun 2024, Tue 7 PM
Cast: Norwegian National Ballet , Norwegian National Opera Orchestra
View Tickets from 85 US$
Opera
12 Jun 2024, Wed 7 PM
Cast: Norwegian National Ballet , Norwegian National Opera Orchestra
Opera
14 Jun 2024, Fri 7 PM
Cast: Norwegian National Ballet , Norwegian National Opera Orchestra
Opera
17 Jun 2024, Mon 7 PM
Cast: Norwegian National Ballet , Norwegian National Opera Orchestra
Opera
18 Jun 2024, Tue 7 PM
Cast: Norwegian National Ballet , Norwegian National Opera Orchestra
Opera
20 Jun 2024, Thu 7 PM
Cast: Norwegian National Ballet , Norwegian National Opera Orchestra
View Tickets from 85 US$
Opera
21 Jun 2024, Fri 6 PM
Cast: Norwegian National Ballet , Norwegian National Opera Orchestra

About

Henryk Mikołaj Górecki was a Polish composer of contemporary classical music. According to critic Alex Ross, no recent classical composer has had as much commercial success as Górecki. Górecki became a leading figure of the Polish avant-garde during the post-Stalin cultural thaw. His Webernian-influenced serialist works of the 1950s and 1960s were characterized by adherence to dissonant modernism and drew influence from Luigi Nono, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Krzysztof Penderecki and Kazimierz Serocki. He continued in this direction throughout the 1960s, but by the mid-1970s had changed to a less complex sacred minimalist sound, exemplified by the transitional Symphony No. 2 and the hugely popular Symphony No. 3 (Symphony of Sorrowful Songs). This later style developed through several other distinct phases, from such works as his 1979 Beatus Vir, to the 1981 choral hymn Miserere, the 1993 Kleines Requiem für eine Polka and his requiem Good Night.

He was largely unknown outside Poland until the mid-to late 1980s, and his fame arrived in the 1990s. In 1992, 15 years after it was composed, a recording of his Third Symphony, Symphony of Sorrowful Songs—recorded with soprano Dawn Upshaw and released to commemorate the memory of those lost during the Holocaust—became a worldwide commercial and critical success, selling more than a million copies and vastly exceeding the typical lifetime sales of a recording of symphonic music by a 20th-century composer. As surprised as anyone at its popularity, Górecki said, "Perhaps people find something they need in this piece of music  somehow I hit the right note, something they were missing. Something somewhere had been lost to them. I feel that I instinctively knew what they needed.  This popular acclaim did not generate wide interest in Górecki's other works, and he pointedly resisted the temptation to repeat earlier success, or compose for commercial reward.

Apart from two brief periods studying in Paris and a short time living in Berlin, Górecki spent most of his life in southern Poland.

Style and compositions
Górecki's music covers a variety of styles, but tends towards relative harmonic and rhythmical simplicity. He is considered to be a founder of the so-called New Polish School. Described by Terry Teachout, he said Górecki has "more conventional array of compositional techniques includes both elaborate counterpoint and the ritualistic repetition of melodic fragments and harmonic patterns."

His first works, dating from the last half of the 1950s, were in the avant-garde style of Webern and other serialists of that time. Some of these twelve-tone and serial pieces include Epitaph (1958), First Symphony (1959), and Scontri (1960) (Mirka 2004, p. 305). At that time, Górecki's reputation was not lagging behind that of his near-exact contemporary and his status was confirmed in 1960s when "Monologhi" won first prize. Even until 1962, he was firmly ensconced in the minds of the Warsaw Autumn public as a leader of the Polish Modern School, alongside Penderecki.

Danuta Mirka has shown that Górecki's compositional techniques in the 1960s were often based on geometry, including axes, figures, one- and two-dimensional patterns, and especially symmetry. Thus, she proposes the term "geometrical period" to refer to Górecki's works between 1962 and 1970. Building on Krzysztof Droba's classifications, she further divides this period into two phases: (1962–63) "the phase of sonoristic means"; and (1964–70) "the phase of reductive constructicism" (Mirka 2004, p. 329).

During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, Górecki progressively moved away from his early career as radical modernist, and began to compose with a more traditional, romantic mode of expression. His change of style was viewed as an affront to the then avant-garde establishment, and though he continued to receive commissions from various Polish agencies, by the mid-1970s Górecki was no longer regarded as a composer that mattered. In the words of one critic, his "new material was no longer cerebral and sparse; rather, it was intensely expressive, persistently rhythmic and often richly colored in the darkest of orchestral hues".

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