Bavarian State Opera tickets 8 February 2025 - Un ballo in maschera | GoComGo.com

Un ballo in maschera

Bavarian State Opera, Munich, Germany
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6 PM
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US$ 128

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Important Info
Type: Opera
City: Munich, Germany
Starts at: 18:00
Acts: 3
Intervals: 1
Duration: 2h 55min
Sung in: Italian
Titles in: English,German

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Cast
Performers
Tenor: Charles Castronovo (Riccardo)
Soprano: Nicole Car (Amelia)
Conductor: Andrea Battistoni
Orchestra: Bavarian State Orchestra
Chorus: Chorus of the Bavarian State Opera
Baritone: Igor Golovatenko (Renato)
Mezzo-Soprano: Yulia Matochkina (Ulrica)
Creators
Composer: Giuseppe Verdi
Librettist: Antonio Somma
Librettist: Eugène Scribe
Director: Johannes Erath
Overview

Composed in 1858 for Naples, the opera was not allowed to be performed there for reasons of censorship. After radical editing, the premiere finally took place in Rome and to this day remains one of the most performed, but also most mysterious of Verdi's works.

A governor, his friend, the friend's wife. A love triangle straight out of a romance novel. The soprano between the tenor and the baritone. But, in Verdi's Ballo in maschera all the protagonists are two-faced. Riccardo, the governor, is lauded as a just sovereign, yet shirks responsibility and seeks refuge from tedium in all manner of distractions - the ultimate kick for a man such as he can only be to risk his own life. 

Renato loves his friend Riccardo almost more than his wife; and she, Amelia, wants not only to eradicate all feelings for Riccardo, but, if possible, even more. Ulrica, the fortune teller, is the shadowy influence who evokes in people an irresistible pull towards death - until the culmination of the dance on the volcano in a deadly masked ball.

History
Premiere of this production: 17 February 1859, Teatro Apollo, Rome

Un ballo in maschera (A Masked Ball) is an 1859 opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi. The text, by Antonio Somma, was based on Eugène Scribe's libretto for Daniel Auber's 1833 five act opera, Gustave III, ou Le bal masqué.

Synopsis

Act 1

A room at Riccardo's house

While the governor Riccardo is asleep, he is being expected by numerous petitioners wishing him peace and quiet and assuring him of their loyalty. Samuel, Tom and their followers who have conspired against Riccardo and are seeking revenge secretly mingle amongst the crowd. Riccardo promises to be responsive to all the justified pleas but his attention is quickly distracted by the guest list of his upcoming ball. He notices the name of Amelia on that list. The mere thought of seeing her again makes him dream. His friend and most trusted advisor Renato, who is also Amelia's husband, is unaware of these thoughts. Renato warns Riccardo of a threatening attack and reminds him of his duties. Riccardo is not willing to be protected and therefore ignores the threat. The highest judge wants to banish the fortuneteller Ulrica. Oscar, Riccardo's page, defends Ulrica and emphasizes how all her prophecies have turned out to be true. Deciding to see for himself, Riccardo persuades everyone to pay Ulrica a visit in disguise at exactly three o'clock.

At the hut of the fortuneteller

Ulrica invokes prophetic spirits from whom nothing can be hidden. Riccardo – disguised as a fisherman –manages to mingle amongst the visitors at Ulrica's without being noticed. Ulrica promises a soldier named Silvano that he will soon become wealthy and receive a promotion. Riccardo makes the fortune of Silvano come true by slipping money and a note into his pocket. As Ulrica sends all her visitors away to admit Amelia, Riccardo secretly stays to eavesdrop on their conversation. Amelia begs for help as she is being tormented by her adulterous feelings for another man. She wishes to have a peaceful heart. Ulrica explains that the only way of finding peace, is by gathering by the gallows at midnight. Riccardo decides to follow Amelia. As the followers of Riccardo, including the judge and Oscar, but also Samuel and Tom arrive at Ulrica's place, Riccardo continues to play his role as a fisherman. He asks Ulrica to have his fortune told. She sees a powerful person in him by reading his palm. She predicts his soon-to-be and violent death by the hand of a friend. It will be the next person who shakes his hand. Riccardo appears unimpressed and makes fun of Ulrica's prediction. He offers his hand to all those present, but nobody dares to take it. At this moment Renato arrives unaware of the prophecy and clasps Riccardo's hand in greeting, thereby revealing the governor's identity. Riccardo thinks himself safe because Renato is his closest friend. He is hailed by his followers.

Act 2

A lonesome field in the surroundings of Boston

Amelia arrives at the gallows. Although she is intimidated by the scary landscape, she is determined to find the remedy which Ulrica had told her about, even if this means killing off all her feelings. Riccardo who had followed her makes her confess her love to him. In exuberance Riccardo suppresses his friendship to Renato. Amelia on the other hand is torn between obligation and desire and wants to die. Unexpectedly Renato appears to warn the governor of the conspirators, who are secretly following Riccardo. Amelia covers herself with a veil before her husband can catch sight of her. Renato and Riccardo exchange their coats so the governor is able to remain unrecognized. Riccardo fleas, making Renato promise to take the veiled woman safely back to town and not asking her identity. Renato and Amelia fall into the hands of the conspirators, who are surprised to see Renato instead of Riccardo. They want to know who the veiled woman is. Renato takes up arms in order to protect her. Amelia interferes by dropping her veil. Renato has to face the fact that his friend's secret lover is nobody else than his own wife Amelia. He is exposed to ridicule. He asks Samuel and Tom to meet him the very next day.

Act 3

Study at Renato's house

Renato is in disbelief of the protestations of innocence of his wife and is determined to kill her. She asks to see their son before she dies. He grants her wish. After Amelia leaves, he comes to the conclusion that it is Riccardo who should be punished with death and not his wife. He lets Samuel and Tom know that he will join the conspirators. The pledge for his honesty shall be his own son. They decide to draw lots to determine who will kill Riccardo. Renato forces Amelia to choose from the slips of paper. His own name comes up. Oscar brings the invitation to the masked ball. Renato deems this celebration to be suitable for the attack and agrees on a sign with Samuel and Tom. Amelia suspects what the three men are plotting and intends to warn Riccardo.

A cabinet at Riccardo's house

Riccardo believes Amelia is safe. He decides to renounce his love to Amelia and to send Renato and his family into another country. Oscar hands him over an anonymous letter in which Riccardo is warned about an attack on the very same evening. Riccardo does not want to be called a coward and plans to attend the ball anyway. There, he wants to say goodbye to Amelia forever.

A ballroom

At the ball Renato learns from Oscar what costume Riccardo is wearing. Amelia recognizes him in his disguise and warns him again. Riccardo still ignores the warning. He explains his decision and bids her a last farewell. At the very same moment Renato fires a shot at Riccardo. With his last breath Riccardo assures his friend Renato that Amelia is innocent as she never broke her marriages vows, and forgives everyone.

Venue Info

Bavarian State Opera - Munich
Location   Max-Joseph-Platz 2

The Bavarian State Opera or the National Theatre (Nationaltheater) on Max-Joseph-Platz in Munich, Germany, is a historic opera house and the main theatre of Munich, home of the Bavarian State Opera, Bavarian State Orchestra, and the Bavarian State Ballet.

During its early years, the National Theatre saw the premières of a significant number of operas, including many by German composers. These included Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde (1865), Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (1868), Das Rheingold (1869) and Die Walküre (1870), after which Wagner chose to build the Festspielhaus in Bayreuth and held further premières of his works there.

During the latter part of the 19th century, it was Richard Strauss who would make his mark on the theatre in the city in which he was born in 1864. After accepting the position of conductor for a short time, Strauss returned to the theatre to become principal conductor from 1894 to 1898. In the pre-War period, his Friedenstag (1938) and Capriccio were premièred in Munich. In the post-War period, the house has seen significant productions and many world premieres.

First theatre – 1818 to 1823
The first theatre was commissioned in 1810 by King Maximilian I of Bavaria because the nearby Cuvilliés Theatre had too little space. It was designed by Karl von Fischer, with the 1782 Odéon in Paris as architectural precedent. Construction began on 26 October 1811 but was interrupted in 1813 by financing problems. In 1817 a fire occurred in the unfinished building.

The new theatre finally opened on 12 October 1818 with a performance of Die Weihe by Ferdinand Fränzl, but was soon destroyed by another fire on 14 January 1823; the stage décor caught fire during a performance of Die beyden Füchse by Étienne Méhul and the fire could not be put out because the water supply was frozen. Coincidentally the Paris Odéon itself burnt down in 1818.

Second theatre – 1825 to 1943
Designed by Leo von Klenze, the second theatre incorporated Neo-Grec features in its portico and triangular pediment and an entrance supported by Corinthian columns. In 1925 it was modified to create an enlarged stage area with updated equipment. The building was gutted in an air raid on the night of 3 October 1943.

Third theatre – 1963 to present
The third and present theatre (1963) recreates Karl von Fischer's original neo-classical design, though on a slightly larger, 2,100-seat scale. The magnificent royal box is the center of the interior rondel, decorated with two large caryatids. The new stage covers 2,500 square meters (3,000 sq yd), and is thus the world's third largest, after the Opéra Bastille in Paris and the Grand Theatre, Warsaw.

Through the consistent use of wood as a building material, the auditorium has excellent acoustics. Architect Gerhard Moritz Graubner closely preserved the original look of the foyer and main staircase. It opened on 21 November 1963 with an invitation-only performance of Die Frau ohne Schatten under the baton of Joseph Keilberth. Two nights later came the first public performance, of Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, again under Keilberth.

Important Info
Type: Opera
City: Munich, Germany
Starts at: 18:00
Acts: 3
Intervals: 1
Duration: 2h 55min
Sung in: Italian
Titles in: English,German
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