Bavarian State Opera 24 May 2024 - Romeo and Juliet | GoComGo.com

Romeo and Juliet

Bavarian State Opera, Munich, Germany
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7:30 PM

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Important Info
Type: Ballet
City: Munich, Germany
Starts at: 19:30

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Overview

Even though John Cranko is South African, he counts as one of the most significant English choreographers of the 20th century. Furthermore, he is a central figure in German ballet history – after all, he contributed greatly to the fact that Germany returned to the forefront of the ballet world in the 1960s. In particular, his version of Romeo and Juliet, created in 1962, directed the eyes of the ballet world back to the "Dance Country Germany" after it had been the catalyst of "Ausdruckstanz" and Modern Dance during the first third of the 20th century.
 

Cranko's Romeo and Juliet is told in the clearest and concise way, making explanations in the program book almost completely redundant. In his choreographic handwriting, each movement resembles an emotion. It is purely classical but combines different styles and influences: from the near acrobatic virtuosity of the soviet ballet to the subtle elegance of the English style. This mixture is especially evident in his pas de deux between lovers. Ever since 1968, the ballet has been in the repertory of the Bavarian State Ballet. Every new generation of audiences and dancers alike is enchanted and devastated by the drama of this piece.

Romeo and Juliet is ballet created by John Cranko to Sergei Prokofiev's eponymous score for the Stuttgart Ballet in 1962 and first seen in America in 1969. The Joffrey Ballet presented the first American production of Cranko's choreography in its 1984–1985 season, including performances in New York City at the New York State Theater and in Washington, D.C. at the Kennedy Center.

History
Premiere of this production: 30 November 1937, Mahen Theatre, Brno

Romeo and Juliet is a ballet by Sergei Prokofiev based on William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet. Prokofiev reused music from the ballet in three suites for orchestra and a solo piano work.

Synopsis

Act I

Scene 1 – The Market Place.
As day breaks, Romeo, son of Montague, is found declaring his love to the fair Rosaline. With the sunrise the market place fills with townspeople among whom are members of the two rival families, the Capulets and the Montagues. Tempers flare and a quarrel develops. The Duke of Verona appears and warns the two fractions that death will the ultimate punishment if the feud does not stop. Romeo and his friends, Benvolio and Mercutio, make reluctant peace with Tybalt, a kinsman of the Capulets.

Scene 2 – Juliet’s anteroom in the Capulets’ house.
Juliet receives her first ball dress from her mother, Lady Capulet, and learns that she is to meet the noble Paris to whom she will be betrothed on the following day. Now she must bid farewell to her childhood.

Scene 3 – Outside the Capulets’ house.
Guests appear for the Capulets’ ball, among them Rosaline. Romeo and his friends, masked, follow her to the hall.

Scene 4 – The ballroom.
Juliet dances with Paris but suddenly she and Romeo behold each other, and it is love at first sight. Tybalt, suspecting Romeo’s identity, tries to start an argument, but is prevented by Juliet’s father who abides by the laws of hospitality.

Scene 5 – Juliet’s balcony.
On the balcony outside her bedroom Juliet dreams of Romeo. He appears below in the garden. They declare their eternal love.

Act II

Scene 1 – The Market Place.
A carnival is in progress in the main square. Romeo, indifferent to the gaiety around him, is discovered by Juliet’s nurse, who brings him a letter from her. She asks Romeo to meet Juliet in the chapel of Friar Laurence.

Scene 2 – The Chapel.
In his cloister, Friar Laurence joins the young lovers in marriage.

Scene 3 – The Market Place.
At the height of the carnival, Romeo returns to the square. Tybalt accosts him but Romeo declines to fight. Mercutio, angered, engages in a duel with Tybalt, and dies at his hands. Romeo, distraught, turns on Tybalt and kills him.

Act III

Scene 1 – The Bedroom.
In Juliet’s bedroom the lovers are awakened by the sunrise, and Romeo, under sentence of exile, must leave Juliet and Verona. Lord and Lady Capulet enter with Paris, but Juliet rejects him.

Scene 2 – The Chapel.
Juliet, appealing for help to Friar Laurence, receives a potion from him that will place her in a death – like sleep. He explains that Romeo will find her in the family tomb and from there they can escape together.

Scene 3 – The Bedroom.
Juliet agrees to her marriage with Paris. After he leaves with her parents, she takes the sleeping draught and is thought to be dead when her family and friends discover her.

Scene 4 – The Capulet family crypt.
Romeo, who has never received Friar Laurence’s message revealing the plan, believes Juliet to be dead and rushes to her tomb. There he finds the mourning Paris and kills him. Embracing Juliet for the last time, he plunges his dagger into his heart. Juliet awakens to find Romeo Dead. Grief-stricken, she kills herself.

Venue Info

Bavarian State Opera - Munich
Location   Max-Joseph-Platz 2

The Bavarian State Opera or the National Theatre (Nationaltheater) on Max-Joseph-Platz in Munich, Germany, is a historic opera house and the main theatre of Munich, home of the Bavarian State Opera, Bavarian State Orchestra, and the Bavarian State Ballet.

During its early years, the National Theatre saw the premières of a significant number of operas, including many by German composers. These included Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde (1865), Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (1868), Das Rheingold (1869) and Die Walküre (1870), after which Wagner chose to build the Festspielhaus in Bayreuth and held further premières of his works there.

During the latter part of the 19th century, it was Richard Strauss who would make his mark on the theatre in the city in which he was born in 1864. After accepting the position of conductor for a short time, Strauss returned to the theatre to become principal conductor from 1894 to 1898. In the pre-War period, his Friedenstag (1938) and Capriccio were premièred in Munich. In the post-War period, the house has seen significant productions and many world premieres.

First theatre – 1818 to 1823
The first theatre was commissioned in 1810 by King Maximilian I of Bavaria because the nearby Cuvilliés Theatre had too little space. It was designed by Karl von Fischer, with the 1782 Odéon in Paris as architectural precedent. Construction began on 26 October 1811 but was interrupted in 1813 by financing problems. In 1817 a fire occurred in the unfinished building.

The new theatre finally opened on 12 October 1818 with a performance of Die Weihe by Ferdinand Fränzl, but was soon destroyed by another fire on 14 January 1823; the stage décor caught fire during a performance of Die beyden Füchse by Étienne Méhul and the fire could not be put out because the water supply was frozen. Coincidentally the Paris Odéon itself burnt down in 1818.

Second theatre – 1825 to 1943
Designed by Leo von Klenze, the second theatre incorporated Neo-Grec features in its portico and triangular pediment and an entrance supported by Corinthian columns. In 1925 it was modified to create an enlarged stage area with updated equipment. The building was gutted in an air raid on the night of 3 October 1943.

Third theatre – 1963 to present
The third and present theatre (1963) recreates Karl von Fischer's original neo-classical design, though on a slightly larger, 2,100-seat scale. The magnificent royal box is the center of the interior rondel, decorated with two large caryatids. The new stage covers 2,500 square meters (3,000 sq yd), and is thus the world's third largest, after the Opéra Bastille in Paris and the Grand Theatre, Warsaw.

Through the consistent use of wood as a building material, the auditorium has excellent acoustics. Architect Gerhard Moritz Graubner closely preserved the original look of the foyer and main staircase. It opened on 21 November 1963 with an invitation-only performance of Die Frau ohne Schatten under the baton of Joseph Keilberth. Two nights later came the first public performance, of Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, again under Keilberth.

Important Info
Type: Ballet
City: Munich, Germany
Starts at: 19:30
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