Arena di Verona 6 July 2024 - Il Barbiere di Siviglia | GoComGo.com

Il Barbiere di Siviglia

Arena di Verona, Arena, Verona, Italy
All photos (10)
Select date and time
9:15 PM

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Important Info
Type: Opera
City: Verona, Italy
Starts at: 21:15

E-tickets: Print at home or at the box office of the event if so specified. You will find more information in your booking confirmation email.

You can only select the category, and not the exact seats.
If you order 2 or 3 tickets: your seats will be next to each other.
If you order 4 or more tickets: your seats will be next to each other, or, if this is not possible, we will provide a combination of groups of seats (at least in pairs, for example 2+2 or 2+3).

Festival

Arena Opera Festival 2024

Arena presents the programs of the 2024 and 2025 Festival. 7 opera titles and 5 evening events in 2024 with a tribute to Puccini and de Bosio on their respective centenaries for 46 appointments from 8 June to 7 September.

Overview

One of Rossini's greatest operas

In Seville, love blooms between Count Almaviva and the beautiful Rosina. However, the young woman is constantly watched by her guardian, Don Bartolo, a grumpy old man who wants to marry her and steal her inheritance. Coming to the couple's rescue is the astute barber Figaro, who (in a whirlwind of deceit, disguises, and misunderstandings) helps the young lovers overcome every obstacle.

History
Premiere of this production: 20 February 1816, Teatro Argentina, Rome

The Barber of Seville, or The Useless Precaution (Italian: Il barbiere di Siviglia, ossia L'inutile precauzione) is an opera buffa in two acts by Gioachino Rossini with an Italian libretto by Cesare Sterbini. The libretto was based on Pierre Beaumarchais's French comedy Le Barbier de Séville (1775). The première of Rossini's opera (under the title Almaviva, o sia L'inutile precauzione) took place on 20 February 1816 at the Teatro Argentina, Rome, with designs by Angelo Toselli.

Synopsis

Place: Seville, Spain
Time: 18th century

Act 1
The square in front of Bartolo's house

In a public square outside Bartolo's house a band of musicians and a poor student named Lindoro are serenading, to no avail, the window of Rosina ("Ecco, ridente in cielo"; "There, laughing in the sky"). Lindoro, who is really the young Count Almaviva in disguise, hopes to make the beautiful Rosina love him for himself – not his money. Almaviva pays off the musicians who then depart, leaving him to brood alone. Rosina is the young ward of the grumpy, elderly Bartolo and she is allowed very little freedom because Bartolo plans to marry her once she is of age and thus appropriate her not inconsiderable dowry.

Figaro approaches singing (Aria: "Largo al factotum della città"; "Make way for the factotum of the city"). Since Figaro used to be a servant of the Count, the Count asks him for assistance in helping him meet Rosina, offering him money should he be successful in arranging this. (Duet: "All'idea di quel metallo"; "At the idea of that metal"). Figaro advises the Count to disguise himself as a drunken soldier, ordered to be billeted with Bartolo, so as to gain entrance to the house. For this suggestion, Figaro is richly rewarded.

A room in Bartolo's house with four doors

The scene begins with Rosina's cavatina, "Una voce poco fa" ("A voice a little while ago"). (This aria was originally written in the key of E major, but it is sometimes transposed a semitone up into F major for coloratura sopranos to perform, giving them the chance to sing extra, almost traditional, cadenzas, sometimes reaching high Ds or even Fs.)

Knowing the Count only as Lindoro, Rosina writes to him. As she is leaving the room, Bartolo and Basilio enter. Bartolo is suspicious of the Count, and Basilio advises that he be put out of the way by creating false rumours about him (this aria, "La calunnia è un venticello" – "Calumny is a little breeze" – is almost always sung a tone lower than the original D major).

When the two have gone, Rosina and Figaro enter. Figaro asks Rosina to write a few encouraging words to Lindoro, which she has actually already written. (Duet: "Dunque io son...tu non m'inganni?"; "Then I'm the one...you're not fooling me?"). Although surprised by Bartolo, Rosina manages to fool him, but he remains suspicious. (Aria: "A un dottor della mia sorte"; "To a doctor of my class").

Count Almaviva, disguised as a soldier and pretending to be drunk, enters the house and demands to be quartered there. In fear of the drunken man, Berta the housekeeper rushes to Bartolo for protection. Bartolo tells the "soldier" that he (Bartolo) has an official exemption which excuses him from the requirement to quarter soldiers in his home. Almaviva pretends to be too drunk and belligerent to understand, and dares Bartolo to brawl. While Bartolo searches his cluttered desk for the official document which would prove his exemption, Almaviva whispers to Rosina that he is Lindoro in disguise, and passes a love-letter to her. Bartolo suspiciously demands to know what is in the piece of paper in Rosina's hands, but she fools him by handing over her laundry list. Bartolo and the Count argue loudly. Basilio enters; then Figaro, who warns that the noise of the argument is rousing the whole neighborhood. Finally, the noise attracts the attention of the Officer of the Watch and his troops, who crowd into the room. Bartolo demands that the Officer arrest the "drunken soldier". The Officer starts to do so, but Almaviva quietly reveals his true identity to the Officer, and he (the Officer) backs off and stands down. Bartolo and Basilio are astonished and mystified; Figaro laughs quietly at them. (Finale: "Fredda ed immobile, come una statua"; "Cold and still, just like a statue"). The confusion intensifies and causes everyone to suffer headaches and auditory hallucinations ("Mi par d'esser con la testa in un'orrida fucina; dell'incudini sonore l'importuno strepitar."; "My head seems to be in a fiery forge: the sound of the anvils deafens the ear.")

Act 2
A room in Bartolo's house with a piano

Almaviva again appears at the doctor's house, this time disguised as a priest who is also a singing tutor and pretending to act as substitute for the supposedly ailing Basilio, Rosina's regular singing teacher. Initially, Bartolo is suspicious, but does allow Almaviva to enter when the Count gives him Rosina's letter. He describes his plan to discredit Lindoro whom he believes to be one of the Count's servants, intent on pursuing women for his master. While Almaviva pretends to give Rosina her singing lesson, Figaro arrives to shave Bartolo. Bartolo demurs, but Figaro makes such a scene he agrees, but in order not to leave the supposed music master alone with Rosina, the doctor has Figaro shave him right there in the music room. When Basilio suddenly appears, he is bribed by a full purse from Almaviva and persuaded to leave again, with much discussion of how ill he looks. (Quintet: "Don Basilio! – Cosa veggo!"; "Don Basilio! – What do I see?"). Figaro begins to shave Bartolo, but Bartolo overhears the lovers conspiring, and angrily drives everybody away.

The scene returns to the location of act 1 with a grill looking out onto the square. Bartolo orders Basilio to have the notary ready to marry him to Rosina that evening. He also explains his plot to come between the lovers. Basilio leaves and Rosina arrives. Bartolo shows Rosina the letter she wrote to "Lindoro", and persuades her that this is evidence that Lindoro is merely a flunky of Almaviva and is toying with her at Almaviva's behest. Rosina believes him and agrees to marry him.

During an instrumental interlude, the music creates a thunder storm to indicate the passage of time. The Count and Figaro climb up a ladder to the balcony and enter the room through a window. Rosina shows Almaviva the letter and accuses him of betraying her. Almaviva reveals his identity and the two reconcile. While Almaviva and Rosina are enraptured by one another, Figaro keeps urging them to leave. Two people are heard approaching the front door, who later turn out to be Basilio and the notary. However, when the Count, Rosina, and Figaro attempt to leave by way of the ladder, they discover it has been removed. The marriage contract requires two witnesses; Figaro is one, but another is needed. The Count makes Basilio an offer he can't refuse: the choice of accepting a bribe and being a witness to his marriage or receiving two bullets in the head (an easy choice, Basilio says). He and Figaro witness the signatures to a marriage contract between the Count and Rosina. Bartolo barges in, accompanied by the Officer and the men of the watch, but too late; the marriage is already complete. The befuddled Bartolo (who was the one who had removed the ladder) is pacified by being allowed to retain Rosina's dowry. The opera concludes with an anthem to love ("Amor e fede eterna, si vegga in noi regnar!").

Venue Info

Arena di Verona - Verona
Location   Piazza Bra, 1

Arena di Verona - the name by which the ancient Roman amphitheater is known, built in Verona around 30 ad. Arena di Verona is a world-famous concert venue. The amphitheatre in Verona is the fourth largest among similar Roman buildings in Italy (after the Colosseum, the amphitheatre in Santa Maria Capua vetera and the amphitheatre in Pozzuoli). One of the best preserved buildings of this type. In 2000, as part of other historical monuments of Verona, the amphitheater was included in the world heritage list. Arena di Verona located on the main square of the city — Piazza Bra.

History of the amphitheater

The amphitheatre was built about 30 years for holding Gladiator fights, naval battles (of navlakhi) and circus performances. After the earthquake of 1117, which almost completely destroyed the outer ring of the amphitheater, it was used as a source of stone for other buildings. In the Middle ages in its arena burned heretics, organized tournaments, festivals, and in the XVIII—XIX centuries — bullfights.

Since 1913, the amphitheater has become a regular venue for Opera performances.

The architecture of the amphitheatre

The building was built outside the city limits and consisted of four elliptical rings (inner axis 44,43 and 73,68 meter; external (including unpreserved fourth ring) — 109,52 and is 138,77 m). The original facade was faced with white and pink limestone from Valpolicella. The preserved facade of the amphitheater is made of stone, cement, river pebbles and pieces of brick.

Inside the amphitheater is completely preserved Cavea. The structure was designed for more than 30,000 spectators, the seats are made according to the Greek custom in the form of marble stairs in 44 tiers.

Opera production

The amphitheater is known for its Opera and concert performances held in it. It is the largest Opera concern in the world, receiving up to 600,000 spectators a year.

Due to the exceptional acoustics of the building, its use was resumed in 1913. To mark the centenary of Giuseppe Verdi, the Opera singer and impresario Giovanni Zenatello and his colleague Ottone Rovato staged the Opera Aida here. Since then, the festival has been held more than 70 times, eventually becoming an annual event.

Nowadays, there are usually four different stage productions each year between June and August. In mid-July, performances are given almost every day. During the winter months, Opera and ballet are performed at the

Philharmonic theatre.

Seats on the stone steps of the amphitheater are much cheaper than specially installed chairs at the bottom. After sunset, candles are lit. The capacity of the arena for Opera performances until recently was 20,000 guests, but for security reasons it is reduced to 15,000.

The arena has become a venue for performances of many world Opera celebrities. It was here that Maria Callas made her debut on the Italian stage, singing Gioconda in Ponchielli's Opera of The same name in the Arena in 1947. In addition to Callas, Giuseppe di Stefano, Tito Gobbi, Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo, Renata Tebaldi, Anatoly Solovyanenko, Vladimir Atlantov, Evgeny Nesterenko, Christian Johansson, and many other performers took part in the festival in different years.

The operas were staged by conductors such as Donato Renzetti, M. Eklund, Z. Peshko and others.

Among the variety performers, the most famous concert was presented by singer Adriano Celentano in 2012, who performed his main songs for two evenings. Tickets for both concerts were sold out in 30 minutes, with a total of more than 30,000 people attending the amphitheater. The concert was a significant event not only for Verona, but also for the whole of Italy.

Important Info
Type: Opera
City: Verona, Italy
Starts at: 21:15
Top of page